The Values of Sigma Chi

While the core values of Sigma Chi are friendship, justice, and learning, the Fraternity also has three core writings that every Sig knows by heart. First of all is the Jordan Standard. Based off of a speech that founder Isaac M. Jordan gave at the 15th Grand Chapter in 1884, the Jordan Standard sets the guideline and minimal requirements for new members.

The confidence of the Founders of Sigma Chi was based upon a belief that the principles which they professed and the ideal of the Fraternity which they sought were but imperfectly realized in the organizations by which they were surrounded.

The standard with which the fraternity started was declared by Isaac M. Jordan to be that of admitting no man to membership in Sigma Chi who is not believed to be:

A Man of Good Character…
A Student of Fair Ability…
With Ambitious Purposes…
A Congenial Disposition…
Possessed of Good Morals…
Having a High Sense of Honor and
A Deep Sense of Personal Responsibility.

Next is the Sigma Chi Creed, written by George Ade, Purdue 1887. While each member of Sigma Chi meets the minimum standards of the Jordan Standard, they cannot become a true gentleman without building themselves to live up to a higher code of conduct than what is listed in the Jordan Standard.

I believe in fairness, decency and good manners. I will endeavor to retain the spirit of youth. I will try to make my college, the Sigma Chi Fraternity, and my own chapter more honored by all men and women and more beloved and honestly respected by our own brothers. I say these words in all sincerity; That Sigma Chi has given me favor and distinction; that the bond of our fellowship is reciprocal, that I will endeavor to so build myself and so conduct myself that I will ever be a credit to our Fraternity.
-George Ade, Purdue, 1887.

Finally, we have The Spirit of Sigma Chi. The establishment of Sigma Chi was a protest against artificiality and false pretense, a plea for personal independence, for congeniality and genuine friendship as the only natural basis for associations in a college brotherhood. The Spirit is the embodiment of these concepts, and it is a calling for men who are inherently different. Sigma Chi is not a fraternity that seeks members who are alike. It was the Founders’ belief that a fraternity that has members of “different temperaments, talents, and convictions” will thrive better than than the fraternity that has members who are alike.

The Spirit of Sigma Chi, as conceived by the Founders more than 150 years ago yet visible and alive today, is based on the theory that…

…Friendship among members, sharing a common belief in an ideal,…
…and possessing different temperaments, talents, and convictions…
…is superior to friendship among members having the same temperaments, talents, and convictions; and that…
…Genuine friendship can be maintained without surrendering the principle of individuality or sacrificing one’s personal judgment.

One Comment

  1. Posted May 9, 2017 at 4:51 am | Permalink

    This arltcie keeps it real, no doubt.

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